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In the Netherlands, on 23-01-2008 a convenant for the built environment has been signed between government (3 ministries: of environment, energy and housing) with energy sector, building sector, installation sector. Representatives of owners- and renters-associations have delivered to work towards the proposed target of 100 PJ reduction of energy use in all buildings. “More with Less” (Meer met Minder) is the widely used plan for implementation.

This deal has been prepared since january 2006. The platform for energy Transition in the Built Environment has been installed in may 2006. Three working groups (i.e. (1) things that need to be done quickly, (2) prepare for the future and (3) regulations that need to be changed to implement (1) and (2)) have been working between august and december 2006. In december 2006 a letter from the platform was send both to the parliament and the Ministers of Environment & Housing as well as Minister of Economic Affairs. One week later, a letter from the Ministries was send with their reply. The momentum was there: building and housing sector were ‘forced’ into the arms of the energy sector.

If the energy sector could propose a plan within 3 months, they could prevent the introduction of a system with “White Certificates” (binding targets for households/customers, which was opposed by the energy sector and others). Since the energy sector had to come up with a joint plan with other participants (building sector mainly), this was done by the end of march 2007. In june 2007 there was a first sign of ‘agreement’. Between june 2007 and january 2008 the plans have been discussed with many organisations and stakeholders, and they have become more and less ‘the only way to achieve these goals’.

According to most experienced participants, there has never been a broader coalition in history to “work this deal towards a success”. There never has been a more urgent signal, like the ones that have been sent in the last year, by the IPCC, as well.

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In the Netherlands, on 23-01-2008 a convenant for the built environment has been signed between government (3 ministries: of environment, energy and housing) with energy sector, building sector, installation sector. Representatives of owners- and renters-associations have delivered to work towards the proposed target of 100 PJ reduction of energy use in all buildings. “More with Less” (Meer met Minder) is the widely used plan for implementation.

This deal has been prepared since january 2006. The platform for energy Transition in the Built Environment has been installed in may 2006. Three working groups (i.e. (1) things that need to be done quickly, (2) prepare for the future and (3) regulations that need to be changed to implement (1) and (2)) have been working between august and december 2006. In december 2006 a letter from the platform was send both to the parliament and the Ministers of Environment & Housing as well as Minister of Economic Affairs. One week later, a letter from the Ministries was send with their reply. The momentum was there: building and housing sector were ‘forced’ into the arms of the energy sector.

If the energy sector could propose a plan within 3 months, they could prevent the introduction of a system with “White Certificates” (binding targets for households/customers, which was opposed by the energy sector and others). Since the energy sector had to come up with a joint plan with other participants (building sector mainly), this was done by the end of march 2007. In june 2007 there was a first sign of ‘agreement’. Between june 2007 and january 2008 the plans have been discussed with many organisations and stakeholders, and they have become more and less ‘the only way to achieve these goals’.

According to most experienced participants, there has never been a broader coalition in history to “work this deal towards a success”. There never has been a more urgent signal, like the ones that have been sent in the last year, by the IPCC, as well.

Author :
Print
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