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A driver sparked a security alert today (8 September), after leaving a scooter parked near the front of the European Commission’s Berlaymont building. Heard in Europe sources said Commission security, fearing a potential bomb attack, called the cops after spotting the parked-up scooter, which appeared to have sailed serenely past the guards. Belgian police cordoned… » read more

Where Is This Soya?

Have any of you ever heard of the Danube Soya Initiative…? That’s what I thought. It is Europe’s most significant (and only) attempt to boost conventional non-GM soya production in countries along the banks of the Danube River. Why do we need to boost the production you ask? Because European farmers and our animals are… » read more

In world monetary history, some currencies have lasted more than a thousand years. That won’t happen with the present euro. Its self-destruction is as certain as anything in politics. What is now urgent is to reform the currency on a solid basis. It will be a world-beater. A sound currency must retain a long-term store… » read more

On Tuesday 9th June, the commissioner on Employment, Social Affairs, Skills and Labor Mobility Marianne Thyssen released a statement on policy orientation for a Social Europe pointing out the willingness of the European Commission on “taking the social dimension on board of all its policies”. This willingness is encompassed with the intention of establishing “minimum… » read more

“It’s just like that Tom Hanks film!” I cried – half rejoicing, half rattled. The breaking news last month that the European Commission had rubber-stamped seventeen GM maize, cotton, soybean and oil-seed rape (and even two GM carnations) import approvals, after months and in-some-cases years of delays, left me momentarily giddy. Because yes, some of… » read more

Guest post by Zuzana Stratilová from the Ministry of Agriculture of the Czech Republic in cooperation with Biotrin. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and their use, especially in agriculture and food industry, remain a controversial topic in the EU. Opinions of different member states are highly polarized. On the one hand, there are member states which… » read more

Guest blog post by Julian Little, Chair of the Agricultural Biotechnology Council. I was recently speaking to a member of the animal feed supply chain who informed me that the amount of animal feed (most of which is genetically modified) to Europe equated to the combined weight of every person in the European Union –… » read more

– New law to be presented on September 11 – first details leaked – Tomorrow, EU telecom Commissioner Neelie Kroes will propose a new EU law to merge the fragmented European telecom markets into a single market by 2016. According to early leaks of the proposal, the EU is expected to ban roaming charges (additional… » read more

Orgalime and CEEMET have responded to the Commission’s recent Communication ‘A stronger European Industry for Growth and Economic Recovery’ with their joint manifesto ‘Manufacturing a Stronger and Greener Europe’, which was presented to the European Commission President José Manuel Durão Barroso at an event attended by industry, MEPs and EU officials (28 Nov 12). The… » read more

On the 24th April in Hannover, the follow-up to the Electra report – launched in June 2008 – will presented to Commission Vice-President Tajani. In ‘The Smart World’, the electrical engineering and electronics industry represented through Electra aims to a) briefly analyse the results of the first Electra report, looking at those areas where progress… » read more

The European Union is currently debating how to promote the equal participation of women and men in decision-making at all levels and in all fields. Given that gender equality is enshrined in Article 23 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, progress is slow and the de facto gender equality has yet… » read more

A scientist working on drug screening is interesting in two things: first, to know whether the drug candidate is effective against cancer cells, and secondly, to understand the way the drug is killing cancer cells.

There is hope indeed, but only for those patients who have enough time to wait. Developing a new drug is an expensive and time-consuming process made even more difficult by today’s global recession.

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