Sunday 21 December 2014

Currently browsing 'InfoSociety'

InfoSociety

 

Net Neutrality: A Hungarian Perspective

Posted by on 16/12/14

A LACK OF NET NEUTRALITY WILL HURT SMALL BUSINESSES AND SITES THE MOST

By Miklos Orban

 

Call me a history geek, but I love the Modern Mechanix blog. It is about how people foresaw the future in different ages, and funny to see how “the future” turned out at the end. But this blog also reminded me of the net neutrality debate. While we all know the positions of Amazon, Facebook or Google on this issue, the voices of small businesses, average websites Modern Mechanix or the everyday Internet user like me have not been heard in this long debate.

 

It is not the likes of Google or Facebook that will suffer where net neutrality is not respected. Companies like these operate with such a presence globally that it is certain they will not be forgotten by any internet service providers anywhere in the world. For instance, recently Facebook struck a deal with service provider Globe, operating in the Philippines, resulting in an offer that allowed access only to Facebook’s content. This demonstrates the influence that this kind of multinational business can leverage. And similarly in Hungary, Magyar Telekom just introduced a few commercial offers which limit access to the biggest websites.

 

If service providers are empowered to decide on the accessibility of content, small companies, local websites or niche blogs will easily be left out these commercial discussions, as they are virtually unknown to most of the ISPs. No survey is required to establish the likelihood of this happening, recent examples have already proved this in many countries, including in Central and Eastern Europe. Moreover, it is also likely that if ISPs are able to, they will demand payment for how content is displayed. Obviously, SMEs like PROKOP in the Czech Republic or small sites like Modern Mechanix will be unable to contend with the likes of Amazon and so access to their content is likely to be slowed or even blocked altogether.

 

Without net neutrality, service providers could also decide to impose significantly higher fees on consumers who wish to access all web content and restrict the lowest paying customers to only what the ISPs choose to offer. This means that fewer and fewer consumers will have access to small websites and e-shops and consequently, these small players will disappear. If net neutrality is not maintained, the landscape of the internet is likely to change drastically to an environment in which only large corporations can survive and small businesses and local players will die. This would hurt Central and Eastern Europe badly. And believe me, the world would be a less interesting place without the Modern Mechanix blog.

Miklos Orban is the chairman of Explico, a regulatory consultancy boutique providing services beyond traditional legal advice.

 

Is ‘digital native’ government possible?

Posted by on 15/12/14
An interview with Jim Bankoff, who just raised another raised $46.5 million in funding for Vox Media (“the fastest growing Web brand of 2014″), caught my eye: “Vox.com’s main draw [is] making sense of complicated issues in ways that are easily digestible for online readers… Our content platform is less about the 1s and 0s [...]

Žiga Turk: ‘If you provide open data they will come’

Posted by on 15/12/14

Žiga Turk, professor and blogger on innovation, sustainability and technology, published a blogpost on Sunday concerning efforts in South-East Europe to open up public data sources. If you offer the data, aggregated by public administrations anyhow, developers and innovators will come in and build applications on top of it, Turk writes.

Turk is a member of BlogActiv’s community of EU bloggers who is definitely worth following. We re-published his latest blogpost here (without editing).

~

Opening public data contributes to the transparency and public oversight that the people have over their governments and public sector that they fund.

“In the EU we are often accused of having big government and public sector; spending too much; collecting too much information etc. But there may be a silver lining to it.

In the globalized competition among the states, of course it is important to improve the level of services, cut costs and reduce the red tape. But it is also important to make the best out of the situation. Which is that the public sector is sitting on a treasure of data which costs taxpayer money to collect and maintain and in many cases citizen effort to provide.

Therefore it would be wise to make sure the data is either put to use or stopped being collected.

It is highly unlikely that the governments would come with the only and the brightest ideas on what to do with that data. On the contrary, the growth around the internet has shown the tremendous potential of innovation in the private sector and the academia.

Zagreb Summit

In the beginning of December I took part at a Summit “Data Driven Innovation in Southeast Europe“. It was organized by several organizations from the region and Google in Zagreb, Croatia. Members of governments, academia, civil societies and businesses from the region met to exchange best practices and discuss the innovation strategy. Innovation that should be based around data openly provided by the public sector.

While Slovenia is also a Central European country, it shares a long common history and therefore institution types and public-sector culture with former Yugoslav republics. There are plenty of opportunities to collaborate and borrow solutions from each other.

A whitepaper summarized  the initiative and best practices. The message from Slovenia was very clear – “if you build it, they will come“. If you build open access to open public data, developers and innovators will come and create services and apps on top of that.

They will create services which are useful to the citizens. But not only directly useful ones, such as live traffic information. They would create services that would make the publicly available data easier to access and understand.

By doing that they would contribute to the transparency and public oversight of that the people have over their governments and public sector that they fund. And thereby indirectly contribute to its quality.

More information in the PressRelease and the Whitepaper.”

Data driven innovation: If you build it they will come

Posted by on 14/12/14

In the EU we are often accused of having big government and public sector; spending too much; collecting too much information etc. But there may be a silver lining to it.

In the globalized competition among the states, of course it is important to improve the level of services, cut costs and reduce the red tape. But it is also important to make the best out of the situation. Which is that the public sector is sitting on a treasure of data which costs taxpayer money to collect and maintain and in many cases citizen effort to provide.

Therefore it would be wise to make sure the data is either put to use or stopped being collected.

It is highly unlikely that the governments would come with the only and the brightest ideas on what to do with that data. On the contrary, the growth around the internet has shown the tremendous potential of innovation in the private sector and the academia.

Zagreb Summit

In the beginning of December I took part at a Summit “Data Driven Innovation in Southeast Europe“. It was organized by several organizations from the region and Google in Zagreb, Croatia. Members of governments, academia, civil societies and businesses from the region met to exchange best practices and discuss the innovation strategy. Innovation that should be based around data openly provided by the public sector.

While Slovenia is also a Central European country, it shares a long common history and therefore institution types and public-sector culture with former Yugoslav republics. There are plenty of opportunities to collaborate and borrow solutions from each other.

A whitepaper summarized  the initiative and best practices. The message from Slovenia was very clear – “if you build it, they will come“. If you build open access to open public data, developers and innovators will come and create services and apps on top of that.

They will create services which are useful to the citizens. But not only directly useful ones, such as live traffic information. They would create services that would make the publicly available data easier to access and understand.

By doing that they would contribute to the transparency and public oversight of that the people have over their governments and public sector that they fund. And thereby indirectly contribute to its quality.

More information in the PressRelease and the Whitepaper.

 

Google News & Spain: Bad day for citizens, online innovation and publishers themselves

Posted by on 11/12/14
Guest blogpost by Jakob Kucharczyk, Director of Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA). Yesterday we learnt that Google will shut down its ‘Google News’ service this year in Spain. This is just one consequence of the introduction in Spain of an ancillary copyright levy (known as the ‘AEDE levy’) affecting online services (apps and websites). In a nutshell, [...]

Prepare for the second wave of digital transformation

Posted by on 09/12/14

By John Higgins, Director General of DIGITALEUROPE

A second wave of digital transformation is coming.  The first one revolutionized the way we order information and spans technological advances from the advent of the mainframe computer to the arrival of Internet search. This second wave will reinvent how we make things and solve problems. Broadly it can be summed up in two words: Big Data.

The expression ‘Big Data’ is used to describe the ability to collect very large quantities of data from a growing number of devices connected through the Internet.

Thanks to vast storage capacity and easy access to supercomputing power – both often provided in the cloud – and rapid progress in analytical capabilities, massive datasets can be stored, combined and analysed.

In the next five years Big Data will help make breakthroughs in medical research in the fight against terminal illnesses. Per capita energy consumption will decline sharply thanks to smart metering – another application of Big Data.  Traffic jams will be rarer, managing extreme weather conditions will become more science, less guesswork. Makers of consumer goods of all kinds will be able to reduce waste by tailoring production to actual demand.

This new ‘data economy’ will be fertile ground that will allow many new European SMEs to flourish.

Broad adoption of such Big Data applications can only happen if the data is allowed to flow freely, and if it can be gathered, shared and analyzed by trusted sources. Size definitely does matter. The bigger the dataset, the more insights we can glean from it, so it’s important that the data can flow as widely as possible.

Some elements of Big Data might involve personal data. People need to be confident these are protected by laws and agreements (such as  safe harbour). All actors in the data economy must work hard to ensure that data is as secure as possible against theft and fraud.

The European Commission has taken an important first step in outlining possible elements of an EU action plan for advancing towards the data-driven economy and addressing Europe’s future societal challenges.

To complement this initiative DIGITALEUROPE has drafted a paper (click here to check it out) outlining what we see as the policy focus in relation to Big Data. We have identified eight priorities:

•    Adopt a harmonised, risk-based and modern EU framework for personal data protection that creates trust while at the same time enabling societally beneficial innovations in the data economy

•    Encourage the protection of Big Data applications from cyber-attacks, focusing regulatory efforts on truly critical infrastructures

  • Support the development of global, voluntary, market-driven and technology-neutral standards to ensure interoperability of datasets

•    Clarify the application of EU copyright rules so to facilitate text and data mining

•    Boost the deployment of Open Data by transposing the Public Sector Information Directive into national law by June 2015 at the latest (EU Member States)

•    Create trust in cross-border data flows by supporting the implementation of the Trusted Cloud Europe recommendations

•    Continue addressing the data skills gap by supporting initiatives like the Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs

•    Continue encouraging private investment in broadband infrastructure and HPC technologies with public funding

DIGITALEUROPE is ready to engage constructively with the European Commission, Parliament and Council to help them formulate a European action plan for the data economy.

It is essential to get this policy framework right., but it is also important to move fast. While Europe is preparing the ground for widespread adoption of the new digital age, the rest of the world is not standing still.

Click here to check our DIGITALEUROPE position paper: Making Europe fit for the Data Economy article

 

European Foundation Centre Conference: MyN and Human Smart Cities

Posted by on 08/12/14

On 5th December 2014, MyN concepts and services illustrating the Human Smart Cities approach were presented at the European Foundation Centre Conference held at the European Economical and Social Committee (EESC).

IMG_20141205_161553

The conference focused on 4 particular aspects (services, partnerships, cultural heritage, technology solutions), each of them were discussed by experts in a specific panel.

Local and regional authorities’ representatives and other professional working in the sector were invited to enrich the discussion and to give their perspectives and example in this field.

For more information on the conference including speakers’ slides:

http://www.efc.be/news_events/Pages/Accessible-Tourism-Innovative-approaches-between-accessibility-and-heritage-protection0624-3730.aspx

European travel sector slammed by abominable Package Travel legislation

Posted by on 08/12/14
By Christoph Klenner, ETTSA At a time when Europe desperately needs to promote a proper functioning marketplace, European legislators have demonstrated how out of touch they can be with the reality of doing business.

What tech can do for policy

Posted by on 23/11/14
ICT is coming to the aid of policy makers, with a number of EU projects using into tech and computation tools to figure out what's happening in policy making. EU Community, too, is on the cutting edge of this development.

La pertinence du droit à l’oubli remise en question par Google

Posted by on 13/11/14

 Le cycle de débat sur le droit à l’oubli lancé en Europe par Google vient de se terminer par la dernière rencontre de son comité consultatif à Bruxelles.

 Nous l’avions évoqué dans un article précédent, Google avait lancé sa campagne « Take Action » en Europe sur la question du droit à l’oubli. L’arrêt Google Spain du 13 mai 2014 a rappelé à Google qu’elle doit se conformer aux obligations européennes en matière de protection des données. Suite à cela Google a ouvert la possibilité aux individus d’introduire une demande de « déréférencement » de liens sur internet

Les conséquences et l’interprétation de cette affaire sont essentielles pour l’avenir de la protection des données.

 Google qui de « bonne foi » avait introduit la possibilité d’introduire une demande de suppression de lien se retrouve dans une situation complexe car elle doit faire face à un nombre grandissant de requêtes(+ de 160 000) sans connaître les critères applicables au droit à l’oubli. La réunion du comité consultatif de Google, constitué pour cette occasion, dans 7 capitales européennes avait pour objectif, entre autre, de dégager des critères permettant une application plus systématique du droit à l’oubli. Un rapport sur le droit à l’oubli sera ensuite publié par Google en janvier 2015.

 La dernière réunion du Comité Consultatif a permis de clôturer le débat, bien que de nombreuses questions restent en suspens. On retiendra plusieurs éléments du débat, le premier concerne la pertinence du droit à l’oubli et les principes à tenir en compte lors de son application. Le second concerne la question du juge compétent pour déterminer l’applicabilité du droit à l’oubli.

 La pertinence du droit à l’oubli remise en question :

L’étendue du droit à l’oubli, et la valeur de ce droit ont été remises en question tout au long du cycle de rencontres en Europe. En effet que ce soit le rapport entre ce droit et les principes de liberté d’expression et de presse ou sur la compétence de Google à juger de son applicabilité, le droit à l’oubli a fortement été remis en question par le Comité consultatif.

 Il est clair que le débat sur le droit à l’oubli s’est rapidement efforcé à remettre en question la pertinence du droit à l’oubli. Le droit à l’oubli doit être équilibré vis à vis des libertés d’expression et de presse. On peut citer par exemple l’intervention de Stéphane Hoebeke, conseiller juridique de la RTBF, favorable à la sensibilisation et àl’éducation vis à vis des médias et qui demandait « Y’a t-il un sens de revenir sur ses informations ? ».

 Limitant les possibilités d’usage de ce droit à des raisons impérieuses sociales qui justifieraient la suppression d’un lien sur la demande d’un individu. Il a été affirmé clairement que le droit à l’oubli ne constituait en aucun cas un droit fondamental.

 La solution avancée par le droit à l’oubli ne fonctionne réellement que dans des cas très particuliers, relevant de raisons impérieuses sociales. Le fait de supprimer le lien d’un moteur de recherche, ne vient pas régler le problème de fond qui réside dans l’information en elle même. Sylvie Kauffman, directrice de la rédaction du Monde, ainsi que Karel Verhoeven, éditeur de Standaard, ont fait remarquer l’importance de la participation des éditeurs en matière de droit à l’oubli. Lorsqu’une information erronée ou non actualisée se trouve sur internet, la personne concernée a le droit de demander à ce que ces informations soient rectifiées ou actualisées. C’est dans l’information en elle même que réside le problème et non dans son référencement sur les moteurs de recherche. En effet la suppression d’un lien ne fait que compliquer son accès mais ne fait pas disparaître l’information d’internet.

 Le professeur Van Eeecke, en droit de l’Internet de l’Université de Anvers, a ainsi souligné l’importance que Google contacte le fournisseur de l’information pour décider des suites à donner. Les éditeurs doivent informer Google lorsqu’ils sont saisis d’une demande de retrait.

 Le Comité consultatif a interrogé à plusieurs reprises les experts sur le fait de savoir à qui revenait la compétence d’appliquer ce droit. Google est-il compétent pour juger des demandes introduites, ou serait-il préférable de créer une Cour d’arbitrage en la matière. Google peut-il être à la fois juge et parti ? Non, et donc à qui confier cette responsabilité ? D’autre part se pose la question des critères applicables pour déterminer l’applicabilité du droit à l’oubli. Pour le moment il n’existe pas de critères concrets permettant de déterminer aisément de l’applicabilité de ce droit. L’objectif de ce débat en Europe avait pour objectif de réfléchir sur l’étendue de ce droit ainsi que les critères applicables.

 Egalité devant le droit à l’oubli

La nécessité de mettre en place des règles précises en matière de droit à l’oubli apparaît plus que nécessaire si l’on veut que les utilisateurs soient traités de la même manière en la matière. Cependant force est de constater que Google remet en question l’arrêt de la Cour de Justice Google Spain, pourtant clair sur l’interprétation à donner de la Directive 95.

D’autre part se pose la question de la territorialité de la suppression des liens, en fonction du domaine exploité. Le droit à l’oubli doit-il permettre de supprimer les liens sur le lieu où la demande a été effectuée, exemple en Belgique lorsque la demande a été faite via google.be ou bien le droit à être oublié doit-il permettre un « déréférencement » sur tout les plateformes de Google c’est à dire google.com ainsi que toute les autres plateformes nationales de Google. 

Google ne peut pas être juge et partie: vers une instance d’arbitrage ?

En offrant la possibilité aux utilisateurs de demander à Google de supprimer un lien internet, Google se place comme juge et partie à la fois. Le comité consultatif a fait remarquer que le droit à l’oubli pose un problème de compétence, et que Google bien que soumise à l’obligation de suppression des liens, ne peut à elle seule décider des cas où l’arrêt Google Spain s’applique. Cette réflexion reste en suspens, il faudra attendre les grandes négociations internationales en matière de protection des données pour savoir ce qu’il adviendra de ce droit et de la compétence des tribunaux à être saisis sur cette question. Se pose aussi la question du financement d’un tel tribunal ou d’une Cour d’arbitrage ad hoc.

  La responsabilité pleine et entière de Google!

Paul Nemitz, directeur des droits fondamentaux et de la citoyenneté de l’Union de la DG Justice de la Commission européenne, s’est montré intransigeant concernant la protection des données personnelles des citoyens européens allant jusqu’à rappeler les scandales de la NSA. Il a demandé à Google de se pencher sur la question de la liberté de presse. De plus il a affirmé, sans mâcher ses mots, que « Google a essayé de contourner la législation européenne » et que Google doit assumer pleinement sa responsabilité. Google ne doit pas se défrayer de sa responsabilité en renvoyant la compétence aux éditeurs. Selon Paul Nemitz Google « a une responsabilité pleine et entière en matière de protection des données et respect de la vie privée.

 Robert Madellin, directeur général de la Direction générale Société de l’information et des médias de la Commission européenne (DG Connect)a affirmé qu’il « faut mettre en place une stratégie pour veiller à ce qu’il n’y ait pas d’abus » des géants de l’internet et qu’il fallait adopter une approche « holistique » en la matière.

 La protection des données est une priorité pour la nouvelle Commission européenne et les conférences de Google ont montré la nécessité de légiférer de manière claire sur la protection des données sur internet. La persistance de terrains flous ne ferait qu’affaiblir la protection des internautes. L’UE doit donc rester vigilante en la matière et adapter sa législation en vigueur au nouveau contexte du numérique. L’harmonisation et la modernisation de la législation en vigueur devraient ainsi permettre de gagner en efficacité et en cohérence en matière de protection des données en Europe.

 

Marie-Anne Guibbert

 

Pour en savoir plus :

 L’équilibre entre droit à l’oubli et droit à l’information est-il possible ? GOOGLE lance sa campagne « Take Action » – Marie Anne Guibbert- EU-Logos Athéna- 17/09/2014 – Langue (FR) –

 http://europe-liberte-securite-justice.org/2014/09/17/lequilibre-entre-droit-a-loubli-et-droit-a-linformation-est-il-possible-google-lance-sa-campagne-take-

 Page web Comité consultatif de Google – Langue (FR-EN) -     https://www.google.com/advisorycouncil/

 L’arrêt Google Spain –CJUE – Langue (FR) – http://curia.europa.eu/juris/liste.jsf?language=fr&num=C-131/12

 Factsheet on the « Right to be Forgotten » ruling (C-131/12) – European Commission – Langue (EN) – http://ec.europa.eu/justice/data-protection/files/factsheets/factsheet_data_protection_en.pdf

 Google’s Advisory Council Hearings: Things to Remember and Things to Forget – The London School of Economics and Political Science – 7/11/2014 – Langue(EN) – http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/mediapolicyproject/2014/11/07/googles-advisory-council-hearings-things-to-remember-and-things-to-forget/

  The territorial reach of the EU’s « Right to be forgoten » : Think Locally, but act globally ? – European Journal of International Law – 14/08/2014 – Langue (EN) – http://www.ejiltalk.org/the-territorial-reach-of-the-eus-right-to-be-forgotten-think-locally-but-act-globally/

 Open letter to Google’s Advisory Council on ‘right to be forgotten – European Digital Rights – Langue (EN) – https://edri.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Open-Letter-to-Google-Advisory-Council.pdf

 .         Dossier Google de Nea say http://www.eu-logos.org/eu-logos_nea-say.php?idr=4&idnl=3305&nea=151&lang=fra&arch=0&term=0

 

 

 

 


Classé dans:DROITS FONDAMENTAUX, Protection des données personnelles

Rosetta: rendez-vous with a comet

Posted by on 12/11/14

ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft arrived at Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on 6 August after a ten-year journey through the Solar System. The landing site, currently known as Site J and located on the smaller of the comet’s two ‘lobes’, was selected just six weeks after Rosetta arrived at the comet.

The mission’s lander, Philae, will be deployed on 12 November at 08:35 GMT/09:35 CET from a distance of 22.5 km from the centre of the comet. It will land about seven hours later, with confirmation expected to arrive at Earth at around 16:00 GMT/17:00 CET.

Three control centres are involved in the landing: the Rosetta Mission Operations Centre at ESA’s Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany; the Lander Control Centre at DLR in Cologne, Germany; and the Lander Science Operations and Navigation Centre at CNES in Toulouse, France. The activities at each control centre will be closely linked and will be featured in a combined English-language ESA TV programme broadcast from ESOC, with live updates transmitted from all three control centres.

Three main media events will be organised. The international media event will take place at ESA’s Rosetta Mission Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt. National media events will be organised by CNES at the Cité des Sciences in Paris, and by DLR at the Philae Lander Control Centre in Cologne, Germany.

http://rosetta.esa.int

ODS is webcasting the event today, 12th of November.

Fondation EurActiv PoliTech is leading the communication & dissemination of Open Discovery Space.

Voices from Marvila’s Neighbourhood

Posted by on 11/11/14

In Marvila, a neighbourhood from the Portuguese capital, everybody has a say in what is needed in the neighbourhood!

LISBON - PILOT PRESENTATION TEMPLATE

MyN team asked Marvila’s neighbours to share their wishes, interests and needs. We listened and took notes on people’s thoughts and would like to learn even more about their wishes for a better neighbourhood.

Here are a sample of Marvila’s wishes and needs:

Malgré les difficultés rencontrées entre 2013 et 2014, le bilan d’Hadopi reste positif

Posted by on 05/11/14

Marie-Françoise Marais présidente de la Haute Autorité pour la diffusion des œuvres et la protection des droits sur internet vient de présenter le 4ème rapport d’activité d’Hadopi. En effet depuis sa mise en place en septembre 2010, Hadopi produit chaque année son bilan annuel dans lequel elle fait état de l’avancement de ses travaux et missions. Très critiquée cette autorité anti-piratage a connu de nombreuses difficultés, mais celle ci ne manque pas de conviction et d’acharnement. Quelques chiffres synthétisent ce qu’elle est : en quatre ans 3,2 millions de courriers d’avertissement ont été envoyés, 159 dossiers ont été transmis au procureur de la République, 36 décisions de justice ont été prises et 19 condamnations prononcées, un résultat qui peut être jugé comme dérisoire au regard du dispositif mis en place et de la dissuasion espérée.

Les missions de la Hadopi sont larges et vont de la sensibilisation à l’information des internautes sur les droits d’auteur, à la protection du droit d’auteur par la réponse graduée, la sensibilisation et la lutte contre la contrefaçon commerciale, en passant naturellement par l’analyse de l’offre et la recherche de solutions nouvelles. Pour chacune de ces finalités Hadopi mène différents types d’action conformément à la loi qui détermine les compétences de la Haute Autorité.

Pour comprendre un peu mieux l’évolution d’Hadopi ces dernières années un retour en arrière s’impose.

Autorité indépendante créée sous le mandat de Nicolas Sarkozy, cette institution était amenée à disparaître en 2013. En effet Aurélie Filippetti, Ministre de la Culture avait annoncé son projet de supprimer Hadopi, car jugé trop onéreux, ainsi que de transférer les compétences au Conseil Supérieur de l’Audiovisuel (CSA). Alors que tout le monde attendait l’apparition du projet de loi celui ci est tombé aux oubliettes, suite à la restructuration du gouvernement, entraînant le remplacement d’Aurélie Filippetti par Fleur Pellerin. La question de la gestion des droits numériques (Digital rights management, en anglais) a été par la suite abordé à travers différents projets de lois notamment dans le projet de loi sur la consommation de Benoît Hamon, qui contient diverses dispositions relatives à l’action de groupe, aux DRM, à la CNIL et au blocage des sites internet.

Les difficultés rencontrées par Hadopi présentées dans le rapport annuel de 2014 concernent en particulier son budget, l’atteinte à son indépendance et le conditionnement de ses compétences. Nous évoquerons ici les difficultés budgétaires d’Hadopi et les efforts menés pour assurer sa pérennité et l’efficacité de son travail. Enfin nous évoquerons l’insuffisance liée à l’offre légale.

Quelles sont les difficultés rencontrées par Hadopi ?

-Une asphyxie budgétaire:

Le rapport énonce clairement les difficultés liées aux restrictions budgétaires qu’a connue la Haute Autorité. En effet le vote du budget pour l’année 2014 a été adopté sans la consultation de celle ci, et impose une restriction budgétaire sans précédent depuis sa création. Le budget a été diminué année après année et représente aujourd’hui 6M d’euros soit 51% de son budget initial. Le rapport annuel caractérise ce budget de « primitif ». Il va s’en dire que cette diminution de budget impose à la Haute Autorité, une capacité d’action diminuée et une surveillance très stricte de sa ligne budgétaire. Elle n’en réduit pas pour autant ses objectifs, et dévoile une affectation très minutieuse des crédits en fonction des actions à mettre en œuvre. Cependant si les subventions accordées à Hadopi ne sont pas augmentées les priorités de celles ci se focaliseront sur deux aspects ; celui de la recherche, l’observation, et la recherche de solutions ainsi que la mise en œuvre des outils de lutte contre la contrefaçon commerciale. Le choix de ces deux priorités tient à la recherche d’un équilibre entre l’expertise technique et l’analyse juridique. Le but est de « réconcilier la loi et les usages, les internautes et les ayants droit, les créateurs et leur public ».

-              L’offre légale jugée insuffisante :

Afin de protéger les droits d’auteur sur internet Hadopi a développé un site référençant les sites internet proposant des offres légales. Ce site internet (offrelegale.fr) permet aux utilisateurs d’une part, de découvrir les sites respectueux vis à vis du droit d’auteur et d’accéder ainsi de manière légale aux contenus via internet. D’autre part il est possible de signaler les contenus numériques non disponibles légalement sur internet.

Le site d’offre légale connaît un succès limité, car 71% des utilisateurs de contenus culturels optent pour un accès gratuits, au détriment du droit d’auteurs et de la rémunération de ceux ci. On peut noter que le nombre de visiteurs par mois (18 000) est en augmentation et on peu espérer que les efforts de diffusion et de promotion de l’offre légale en parallèle des actions menées pour lutter contre le téléchargement illégal des contenus culturels permettra à Hadopi d’assurer le rôle qui lui a été confié.

Enfin Hadopi est aussi en charge d’analyser les comportements des usagers de contenus numériques afin de pouvoir proposer des solutions innovantes qui soient à la fois respectueuses du droit d’auteur mais aussi attractives pour leurs usagers.

Les difficultés budgétaires n’ont cependant pas empêché Hadopi de mettre en place une nouvelle stratégie d’encouragement au développement de l’offre légale, d’augmenter les formations et ses actions en matière de sensibilisation du grand public concernant les droits d’auteur et la création numérique. Enfin elle a pu mettre en place des outils opérationnels visant à lutter contre la contrefaçon commerciale.

En attendant le prochain rapport annuel, nous souhaitons qu’Hadopi puisse continuer à mener les activités précédemment engagées et participe au grand débat européen concernant le droit d’auteur. Hadopi ne compte plus ses adversaires, l’Assemblée nationale n’a pas volé à son secours et le budget proposé de 6 millions d’euros est resté en l’état bien que plusieurs parlementaires (dont Franck Riester ancien rapporteur et membre du collège) aient volé à son secours : l’amendement qui prévoyait de donner 1,5 millions de plus comme le souhaitait l’administration a été écarté. La lente asphyxie se poursuit. Les polémiques et les passions s’apaisent de cet apaisement pourrait naître une solution réaliste que la personnalité du nouveau ministre de la culture, Fleur Pellerin, pourrait favoriser. De son côté le Parlement européen qui fut un acteur important est-il prêt à reprendre la bataille qu’il a mené. Ce sont les circonstances du moment qui permettront d’y répondre. A ce stade retenons que les auditions des commissaires désignés ont montré que le droit d’auteur et la propriété intellectuelle ont une priorité élevée dans les travaux de la nouvelle Commission. Par ailleurs malgré le fait que le statut d’exception culturelle ait été retenu par les négociateur du TTIP, il n’est pas dit que toute dérive soit exclue.

 

Marie-Anne Guibbert

 

En savoir plus :

 

  • Rapport d’activité 2013-2014 – Hadopi – Langue (FR) –

https://m.contexte.com/docs/5512/rapport-2013-de-la-hadopi.pdf

  • Le discours de Marie-Françoise Marais pour la présentation du Rapport Annuel 2013-2014 – Langue (FR) –  

http://hadopi.fr/sites/default/files/Discours_RA_hadopi_0.pdf

http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/affichTexte.do?cidTexte=JORFTEXT000020735432&categorieLien=id

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Classé dans:Droit à l'information, DROITS FONDAMENTAUX, Liberté d'expression

EU Community: What is coming up?

Posted by on 05/11/14

Making EU policy more efficient. That is the goal with which EU Community was launched, about one year ago.

The project is built on the understanding that EU policy making is changing. More and more people engage with EU decision makers. More and more information is available.

This should help us better understand the EU’s day-to-day law making… but has it done this, so far?

Policy makers and EU professionals are swamped with information. The challenge, today, is not so much finding information to support certain policies, but finding the right information to base better policy-making on.

The EU Community team has been working hard, behind the scenes, to create a number of tools that will shed light on what really matters.

We are now close to launching the beta version of our first application: EurActory.

EurActory is our application that focuses on ‘people’. It tells you who the most relevant EU experts are, and what you need to know about them.

It scans the growing amount of information about people involved in EU policy making. It analyses the information to understand EU professionals’ reputation and fields of expertise. You can browse experts by policy area or dive into profile pages.

It will act as a rich database, containing all the essential information about the people making, influencing and studying EU policy making. But there is more…

Machines can’t have it all. Your input, as a person working on EU affairs, is key. Who do you think is a ‘must-follow’ person on climate & energy policy? Or who is, in your experience, the best speaker for a conference about innovation & entrepreneurship in the EU?

As more and more EU experts get involved, they will benefit from your input and you’ll benefit from theirs. EurActory will open up EU policy making to the combined expertise of those studying, lobbying or making it.

The goal? Working together towards more efficient EU policy. And saving you time.

Any thoughts?

Connect on Twitter or on LinkedIn or drop a line below, in the comments!

Laurens,

EU Community

All stream, no memory, zero innovation

Posted by on 02/11/14
Tackling corporate memory loss and innovation failure requires a different paradigm than that offered by social media. My previous post (Plus ça change) was, I realise now, about more than just EC corporate memory loss, but it took a comment from a reader before I realised it. Which neatly demonstrates how sharing leads to innovation. [...]

Advertisement